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Cops taser Somerset chap's nether regions

Accidental discharge narrowly misses Beemer owner's 'nads

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A Somerset man pulled on suspicion of "driving a BMW without insurance"* ended up with a groinful of Taser after an officer accidentally discharged the electric law enforcer into his nether regions.

According to the BBC, 49-year-old Peter Cox was going about his business in Bridgwater on 13 July, when he spotted a patrol car on his tail and "pulled over at a friend's house, where he was doing landscaping work".

Presumably, he then got out of his car, since an officer "pointed the Taser at him for a few seconds before lowering the weapon". The Taser then discharged, "hitting his groin and ankle but narrowly missing his genitals".

Cox recounted: "As soon as it was done, [the officer] came running up to me apologising and said it was an accidental discharge. It was dreadful. The pain was unbelievable. It was the worst pain I'd ever felt."

He added: "It paralysed my legs and the top of my body. I felt physically sick and I had a massive headache."

Paramedics treated Cox, who suffers from Guillain Barre syndrome - "a disease of the nervous system which causes numbness and weakness and a degree of paralysis".

Police admit they'd accidentally administered Cox 50,000 volts, but claim he acted aggressively.

A statement explained: "On Tuesday morning officers stopped a man in Bridgwater suspected to be driving a vehicle without insurance. The man appeared to become aggressive and the officer removed his Taser in accordance with protocol.

"On lowering the Taser it was accidentally discharged. The man was given first aid at the scene but is not believed to be injured. Police are now looking into this incident."

Cox, too, is looking into getting some legal advice over the incident. He claims he was not acting aggressively, and that "his insurance company had confirmed immediately after he was stopped he had valid cover". ®

Bootnote

* The BBC's wording. We're weren't aware there was a specific offence covering Beemers.

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