Feeds

Apple revenue tops bullish expectations by $1bn

iPod sales slipping. But who gives a %$#@?

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Wall Street moneymen were expecting a big quarter for Apple, and with today's announcement that the Cupertinians had pulled in $15.7bn in revenue in their third quarter of fiscal 2010, those prognosticating financial folks got what they were hoping for — and a billion dollars more.

"It was a phenomenal quarter that exceeded our expectations all around, including the most successful product launch in Apple's history with iPhone 4," CEO Steve Jobs said in a canned statement. "iPad is off to a terrific start, more people are buying Macs than ever before, and we have amazing new products still to come this year."

That "most successful product launch", it must be noted, took place on June 24. Apple's quarter ended on June 27.

But those three days, although they did bring in revenue from 1.7 million iPhone, weren't really needed. From the quarter's $15.7bn in revenue, Apple squeezed an operating profit of $3.25bn.

It achieved these quarterly numbers by selling 3.47 million Macs, a new record for a single quarter and a 33 per cent year-on-year increase, and 8.4 million iPhones, a 61 per cent year-on-year uptick. The iPod continued to slide, but with 9.41 million sold, a 8 per cent decline wasn't that hard to take — especially considering that 3.27 million iPads were sold.

Apple's revenues "beat the Street", as the cliché goes: before Apple released its numbers, MarketWatch reported that "consensus estimates from Thomson Reuters" had pegged Apple's revenue to be $14.75bn for the quarter — a figure that agreed with the Wall Street Journal's expectations. Bloomberg BusinessWeek was only slightly more conservative, citing unnamed analysts who predicted a $14.7bn quarter. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.