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Data Domain gets Nehalem boost

Doubled mainstream deduplication performance

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We understand Data Domain is introducing a new top-end mainstream product, more than twice as fast as HP's D2D4312 StoreOnce deduplication offering.

The DD6xx series of products is Data Domain's mainstream, with the DD880 being its extreme high-end appliance, deduping at up to 8.8TB/hour. The DD690 is the fastest mainstream appliance, with up to 36TB of usable capacity and a 2.7TB/hour inline deduplication rate.

Inline deduplication is carried out as backup data lands on the device, and not afterwards in a post-process deduplication exercise. The faster inline deduplication is carried out the less time is needed for backups to happen. It means customers' data is better-protected.

The DD670 has, we are told by people close to the situation, half the number of CPUs of the HP D2D4312, a little more than one third of the memory, and is capable of inline deduplication at 5.4TB/hour, whereas the D2D4312 achieves 2.4TB/hour. We do not know how many processors the D2D4312 employs - HP is keeping that information private.

The previous top-end DD6xx model, the DD690, dedupes at half the rate of the DD670, and does so using quad-core, pre-Nehalem Xeons - dual 5400s we believe. A doubling of performance has been achieved in the past by Data Domain increasing CPU horsepower, riding the Intel processor curve.

When the DD690's performance was lifted to 2.7TB/hour we suggested it could eventually go to 5.4TB/hour by doing this, using Nehalem 5500 processors. That looks like what has happened, except that Data Domain is introducing a new model, the DD670 and not upgrading the DD690.

That product stays on the books, not being retired, but surely the end is now in sight, unless there is a CPU boost being planned for it which will lift its performance above 5.4TB/hour. Perhaps it will use six-core processors? That would explain why a DD670 moniker has been used for the presumably Nehalem-based DD670, leaving open the prospect of a coming DD690 upgrade.

We expect a formal announcement from Data Domain about the DD670 later today. ®

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