Feeds

Pirate Party storms out of uber-secret ACTA negotiations

ACTA in haste, repent at leisure?

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The level of secrecy shrouding the EU’s ACTA negotiations reached new heights earlier this week, with the news that Pirate Party MEP Christian Engstrom felt compelled to abandon a meeting with ACTA negotiators in the European Parliament after he was forbidden from sharing information with the public.

According to a write-up on TorrentFreak, a blog dedicated to bringing the latest news about BitTorrent, Commission negotiators were scheduled to update European parliamentarians on progress in the latest round of ACTA negotiations in Lucerne.

An invite went out to Pirate Party MEP Christian Engstrom, but the meeting was closed to the public and, he was informed, he was not allowed to share any information he obtained at the meeting with his electors.

According to Engstrom: "At first the Commission seemed unwilling to answer this question with a straight yes or no, but after I had repeated the question a number of times, they finally came out and said that I would not be allowed to spread the information given."

He then left the room, complaining that he was "not prepared to accept information given under such conditions in this particular case".

Engstrom further accused the Commission of a "disgraceful" violation of the Lisbon Treaty, which requires full information to be provided to the European Parliament. A secret oral meeting with no documents handed out certainly does not meet this condition.

One reason for nervousness on the part of ACTA negotiators may lie in an embarrassing leak earlier this year. French digital rights group La Quadrature du Net published online a consolidated version of the ACTA text, containing a full copy of the deal as it stood on 18 January, 2010.

The problem is that most organisations leak, and the harder you try to keep something secret the greater the pressure to reveal. The only difference is that if you keep the wraps on for too long, not only will your secrets always eventually spill, but you end up looking sneaky and undemocratic as well. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU
And hey - no need to tell the website you've de-listed. That'll make it easier ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.