Feeds

Double whammy: The music tax based on deep packet inspection

A cure that kills the patient?

New hybrid storage solutions

The innocent man must be punished levied

"Were ISPs required to pay a price for the value of copyrighted media on networks," Page and Touve argue, "the mechanism would be in place to encourage a balance between these costs and benefits. This balancing act might occur through the incentive to either (a) 'wise up' the dumb pipes by cleaning out the unlicensed media files in an effort to avoid paying the real costs of these files, or (b) accepting this payment for media as the cost of doing business while finding new ways to source the value of these creative works."

Despite what TalkTalk's Andrew Heaney says, ISPs really, really hate freetards - they run up most of the transit costs, but despite their evident appetite for media consumption, these subscribers bring home no more revenue than a granny who only uses her connection for Hotmail. But realising the value of that is traffic can be done in a number of ways.

You can be sure that Heaney would pass such a tax onto all his subscribers - and let everyone know where to point the finger. The levy punishes all subscribers, yet only one third of broadband subscribers ever engage in P2P copyright infringement - and the hardcore who do it most is much smaller. A levy also gives everyone the chance to act the "victim", and freetards feed off the feeling of victimized by the music business. (See Kick Me Again, RIAA - Please!).

And would an ISP, with the threat of prosecution lifted, really "find new ways to source the value of these creative works"? There's no reason they should, and nothing in the paper suggests they would. They're much more likely to view it as a "problem solved" - the BPI doesn't keep calling any more. Sorted!

One great advantage of voluntary paid-for P2P is that once you put us in the position of being consumers, we start getting stroppy and demanding a better service... unlike with a levy.

Another great advantage is voluntary P2P doesn't require intrusive monitoring for all subscribers, whether they want it or not. As Sanders puts it:

"Things that look benign - like bunging a bit of money to the songwriters - seem to involve handing control of who gets what to the black box division* of BAe Systems." ®

Bootnote

'Black box' is the name for the pot of royalties collected by performing rights societies, but declared 'unattributable' and never paid out.

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.