Feeds

Patch Tuesday sounds death knell for Win XP SP2

Hasta la vista

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Microsoft released the expected four security advisories on Tuesday, three of which earn the dread rating of critical. They collectively address five security vulnerabilities.

There are two critical fixes for Windows in the batch, including an update designed to resolve a zero-day vulnerability involving Windows Help and Support Centre that's become a hackers' favourite over recent weeks. The vulnerability was controversially disclosed by Google staffer Tavis Ormandy prior to Microsoft providing a fix.

The other two critical updates cover flaws in Microsoft Access ActiveX component and the CDD display driver for Windows 7 and Windows 2008R2. Lesser risk "important" updates cover security bugs in the handling of attachments by Microsoft Outlook.

Tyler Reguly, senior security engineer at security firm nCircle, described July's patches as "pretty mundane" in terms of corporate security.

"The most interesting vulnerability for the enterprise is MS10-045, which lets an attacker use a specially-crafted UNC path in an Outlook attachment to bypass Outlook’s warning about opening potentially malicious attachments," Reguly said. "This is significant because Operation Aurora and other high profile email based attacks over the last year have proven to be highly successful."

The Internet Storm Centre has once again put together a handy overview of Microsoft's latest Patch Tuesday update here. Microsoft's bulletin is here.

July 2010's Patch Tuesday marked the last month Microsoft will issue patches for either Windows XP Service Pack 2 and Win 2000. Security watchers reckon a significant proportion of Windows machines are still running Win XP SP2.

"Since Windows XP is still the most popular OS version for Windows, I believe we’re dealing with hundreds of millions of Windows XP SP2 systems that need to be upgraded," said Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys. "Our own monitoring shows that roughly 50 percent of all XP machines still run on the SP2 version. XP SP2 machines can be found both in corporate installations and are also very often the OS on home machines." ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.