Feeds

eBay whacked with giant patent suit

How much for the troll?

The essential guide to IT transformation

eBay is being sued for a minimum of $3.8bn by a company which claims the auction house wilfully copied six of its patents.

Should eBay be found guilty of wilful and malicious infringement it would have to pay three times that or up to $11.4bn.

XPRT Ventures LLC of Connecticut claims that eBay not only stole its technology for use in online payment systems including PayPal but added insult to injury by then filing its own patents.

XPRT's lawyer Stephen Moore of Kelley Drye & Warren told IPWatchdog: "What makes this case particularly egregious is the allegation that eBay incorporated our client XPRT’s inventive concepts into one of eBay’s own patent applications without reference to XPRT’s own patent filings. Claims of this patent application were later rejected multiple times based on XPRT’s own patent applications without eBay being able to show earlier invention of such concepts."

One of the inventors, George Likourezos, claims to have held meetings with eBay to demonstrate his online payment technologies with the aim of doing a deal and getting them used on eBay's auction site. After the meeting, it is alleged, a lawyer representing eBay contacted Likourezos to ask for more documents and information which were handed over on an understanding of confidentiality and payment should eBay decide to use the technology.

Instead the same lawyer who got the information from Likourezos went on to file applications on eBay's behalf which included XPRT's technology.

The US Patent Office rejected eBay's application four times because of XPRT's patent, which was filed two years earlier.

XPRT claims that this very act proves that eBay believes the technology was patentable - otherwise it would not have attempted to file its own patent.

XPRT further claims that a confidentiality agreement signed with eBay had its date changed by an eBay lawyer.

The claims date back to when Meg Whitman was running the online tat bazaar.

eBay spin doctors told news wires they were reviewing the filing and would defend themselves vigorously.

The lawyer's full statement is available here. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS
YouGov poll reveals terrible truth about the enemy within
Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?
Do Brits risk arrest for watching beheading video nasty? We asked the fuzz
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
NBN Co claims 96 mbps download speeds for FTTN trial
Umina trial also delivers 30 mbps uploads, but exact rig used not revealed
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?