Feeds

Women would rather be on Facebook than on the toilet

And sleep with their PDAs

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

A third of young women will check their Facebook account first thing in the morning, leaving having a pee and brushing their teeth till after they'd watered their Farmville crops.

The frightening statistic came in a survey by lady-oriented US network Oxygen.

The survey of 1600 18-35-year-old social media users - who have "Live out Loud lifestyles" - found more than half spent more time talking to people online than face to face.

Just over a third said the first thing they did in the morning was to check Facebook, leaving bathroom basics till some later unspecified time.

The figures showed some arguably contradictory notions, with two thirds of women surveyed using Facebook as a career networking tool, but 42 per cent being untroubled by pics of them bladdered appearing on the site, and a third thinking pics of them making obscene gestures weren't a problem.

They also seem unconcerned about flashing their location, with 56 per cent happy to tweet it out and 50 per cent flagging current thoughts to the world. Yet at the same time, just over half don't trust Facebook with their private info, while 89 per cent believe you shouldn't post anything you wouldn't want your parents to see.

So it's no surprise that 50 per cent of single women think the web is a perfect place to meet potential partners, with six per cent thinking it's a great way to hook up. Funnily enough, women are less likely than men to use Facebook to ditch their love interest.

If that all seems totally wrong-headed and self-contradictory, it's worth remembering that the survey only covers actual social networking users, rather than woman who have real world conversations or who restrict their hooking up to pubs, night classes, workplaces, petrol station forecourts or whatever.

Perhaps then it's no surprise that 37 per cent of the respondents have fallen asleep clutching nothing in their hands but a PDA. ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.