Feeds

EMC plucks Greenplum

Charges into data warehousing & BI

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

EMC is getting into the data warehousing / business intelligence (DW/BI) area by buying Greenplum. This takes it into direct competition with Oracle and its Exadata product line.

Greenplum has about 100 customers, including the New York Stock Exchange and T-Mobile USA. And it is to be the foundation of a new data computing product division within EMC’s Information Infrastructure business.

The company develops DW/BI software with a “shared-nothing” massively parallel processing (MPP) architecture that operates in virtualised X86 servers and EMC thinks Greenplum fits perfectly into its private cloud, virtualised server and federated storage worlds.

There's an open source angle too: Greenplum's software is based on the PostgreSQL database

So why Greenplum?

There is an explosion in the use of digital sales channels and mobile internet devices. This creates a parallel explosion in data about online sales, and the faster that data can be accessed in a data warehouse and analysed by a business intelligence application, the faster a business can identify profitable and unprofitable sales trends and maximise the former and minimise the latter.

If businesses can run their DW/BI systems in near real-time then that gives them a better ability to optimise their product and pricing mix.

An EMC insider says that Greenplum reduced a 10-hour query in a traditional system to six minutes for O'Reilly Media. The customer used to make one BI run a day and now runs six an hour.

Using Greenplum software, data is automatically partitioned across multiple "segment" servers, and each "segment" owns and manages a distinct portion of the overall data. Its database is able to hold and and access warehoused data better than standard relational databases, with the result that BI queries run faster.

Chorus line

Greenplum has a product called Chorus with which IT and DBAs can establish "one or more pool of commodity servers and storage ahead of demand, and can then create new database instances and sandboxes in minutes with just a few clicks. These databases could be small sandboxes on just a couple of servers, or they could be multi-petabyte marts across hundreds of servers. Pools can be expanded by adding more servers, and the databases can themselves grow to span more servers and storage using Greenplum Database's online expansion capabilities."

Two years ago EMC set up a DW/BI competency centre. At that point HP had announced a tie-up with Oracle to produce the HP Oracle Database machine. Greenplum was then working with Sun on the X4500 Thumper hardware. Since then Oracle bought Sun and replaced the HP hardware with Sun's in its Exadata system.

EMC will continue to offer Greenplum’s full product portfolio to customers. It also plans to deliver "new EMC Proven reference architectures as well as an integrated hardware and software offering designed to improve performance and drive down implementation costs".

In other words we can expect an EMC Exadata-type system. That system includes server hardware, which EMC does not make. There is a possibility then, that we will see a Greenplum V-block, using VMware virtualisation, Cisco UCS servers and EMC storage.

It's a deal

Greenplum's CEO, Bill Cook, will run the new data computing product division and report to Pat Gelsinger, the president and COO for EMC's Information Infrastructure Products division.

The all-cash acquisition is expected to be completed by the end of September - the cash amount has not been revealed. Greenplum has reportedly raised around $61m of funding, so a price of $100m to $150m might be in the right ballpark.

Link: EMC press release ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.