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Microsoft goes AC/DC with Instaload battery tech

Bunny botherers take it from both ends

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Microsoft bigged up a technology yesterday that simplifies the battery installation process by forgoing the need to lopsidedly peer at the plus and negative signs on the energy gizmo.

InstaLoad is a patented battery contact design that Microsoft has made available for licence by third party device suppliers.

Redmond said that bunny-botherers Duracell had already signed up to endorse the technology.

The software giant didn't disclose how much individual licences would cost, however.

"Never again will people have to squint to see battery installation diagrams - the device simply works regardless if the battery is installed positive-side-up or positive-side-down," said MS.

The technology is compatible with CR123, AA, AAA, C and D batteries.

InstaLoad works by using battery contacts designed to operate from both ends - thereby dismissing the need to worry about the plus and negative polarity on the power cell. Microsoft said the tech could be particularly useful for someone installing a battery into a device in a dimly lit room, say.

It's not altogether unusual to see Microsoft develop hardware tech. It runs its own hardware intellectual property licensing house that counts mouse, keyboard and webcam technologies under its roster. ®

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