Feeds

Nokia makes merry with iPhone death-grip

Or as merry as Finns can be, anyway

The essential guide to IT transformation

Nokia has joined Motorola in capitalising on the iPhone 4's notorious antenna problems.

Nokia has published a helpful post entitled How Do You Hold Your Nokia? on its corporate blog. The punchline, predictably, being that “you’re free to hold your Nokia device any way you like. And you won’t suffer any signal loss.”

Which is mostly, but not completely true. All phones lose some RF capability if obscured by the salty bag of water that is the human body. The flaw in Apple's design, as AnandTech's excellent testing has revealed, is the lack of coating on the antenna.

“Anything conductive which bridges the gap in the bottom left couples the antennas together, detuning the precisely engineered antennas," the authors note. "It's a problem of impedance matching with the body as an antenna, and the additional antenna that becomes part of the equation when you touch the bottom left."

It's a small, but monumentally silly design mistake.

Unlike Motorola's jibes, there's teeth behind Nokia's. Nokia has launched three fusillades of lawsuits against Apple, seeking to halt iPhone shipments. Funnily enough, four of the five patents in the third and most recent lawsuit, filed in May, related to antenna design.

Apple has countersued PDF, claiming that it's acting anti-competitively: that what Nokia was really after was Apple's own IP (making it conditional of a settlement between the two), seeking extortionate royalties, and accusing it of misleading standards authorities when it donated the same IP to the patent pool.

But Apple doesn't really need to respond with knocking copy - not when Nokia's carefully cultivated fans are deserting. One of Nokia's most popular fan bloggers today jumped ship.

Ricky Gadden, who ran the Symbian Guru site for almost four years, explained that: “I can’t continue to support a manufacturer who puts out such craptastic ‘flagships’ as the N97, and who expects me to use services that even most of Nokia’s own employees don’t use.”

Gadden was referring to the dog's breakfast that is Ovi. But at least that's easily fixable, and few would mourn it. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.