Feeds

IBM declares undying love for Mozilla's Firefox

But what browser did it tell its 400,000 staff to drop?

New hybrid storage solutions

Big Blue has ditched an unnamed browser in favour of Mozilla’s Firefox, the company’s Bob Sutor confirmed in a blog post today.

IBM’s open source and Linux veep didn’t reveal which surfing tool the firm had dropped, but Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari and Opera Software’s Opera were all effectively shown the door today.

“We’re officially adding a new piece of software to the list of default common applications we expect employees to use, and that’s the Mozilla Firefox browser,” said Sutor.

“Firefox has been around for years, of course. Today we already have thousands of employees using it on Linux, Mac, and Windows laptops and desktops, but we’re going to be adding thousands more users to the rolls.”

IBM has nearly 400,000 employees on its books worldwide, so its declaration of Firefox love might hurt a little bit in other browser camps. At the same time, it will hardly come as a surprise given that the company has contributed to Mozilla’s open source effort over the past decade.

In fact some might ask: What took you so long, IBM?

Sutor said IBM staff wouldn’t be forced to use Firefox as their default browser at work. But the company will roll it out to all new computers within Big Blue, and will strongly urge its employees to embrace Mozilla’s open source surfing tool.

He added that IBM had adopted Firefox to prepare the firm for the arrival of all things cloudy.

“For the shift to the cloud to be successful, open standards must be used in the infrastructure, in the applications, and in the way people exchange data,” he opined.

“The longstanding commitment of Mozilla to open standards and the quality of the implementation of them in Firefox gives us confidence that this is a solid, modern platform that should be part of IBM’s own internal transformation to significantly greater use of Cloud Computing.”

The Register asked Sutor, via the wonder of Twitter, to tell us which browser the company had dumped after throwing its arms open to Firefox.

But we've had no reply at the time of writing. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.