Feeds

Database duo deliver Windows Phone 7 apps storage

Plugs Microsoft's mobile hole

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

A tiny database duo are promising what mighty Microsoft won't deliver with the first Windows Phone 7 - an on-phone database for non-Microsoft applications.

McObject will support its object-oriented Perst .NET open-source database on Windows Phone 7 after Perst was ported and offered as a product by enterprising consultant APPA Mundi.

The presence of a local database on Windows Phone 7 means applications written by anyone other than Microsoft now have access to local storage, search and retrieval.

While Windows Phone 7 will ship from Microsoft in October with SQL Server Compact Edition, it will only be for use by applications built by Microsoft rather than third parties, as APIs for Microsoft's miniature database will not be exposed to outsiders.

It's among a number of limitations Microsoft's placed on Windows Phone 7 version 1.0 so it can deliver something that's stable and risk free, and that provides touch-screen parity with Apple and Android to help stop the erosion of Windows mobile's market share.

Windows Phone 7 also won't let applications talk to each other or run in the background either.

Mundi's work has caught Microsoft's eye. The company's director of Windows Phone 7 "experience" Brandon Watson called the development "epic" saying: "We are going to be following up with them."

Mundi principal and Microsoft device application Most Valuable Professional (MVP) Andy Wigley, who ported Perst, said the move would be "really appealing for anyone who wants to persist even a moderate amount of data."

The work targets business applications that need local data storage, search and retrieval more than the consumer market and web apps like Facebook and Twitter Microsoft's clearly prioritized to catch Apple. Perst is also available for Java 2 Micro Edition with Perst Lite released in 2006 for RIM's BlackBerry - strong among business types. A version of Perst is also available for Google's Android.

Perst .NET is built using C# and works with desktop versions of Microsoft's Silverlight. the .NET Compact Framework and the full .NET Framework. Applications on Windows Phone 7 are written to a superset of Silverlight 3.0 and parts of Silverlight 4.0 - you can see what's supported here.

Wigley is now porting McObject's customer relationship application for desktop Silverlight to Windows Phone 7.

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?