Feeds

Google can kill or install apps on citizen Androids

Vanished 'RootStrap' masqueraded as movie preview

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Google has the power to not only remove applications from users' Android phones, but remotely install them as well.

Last week, Google told the world it had exercised its Android "Remote Application Removal Feature," reaching out over the airwaves and lifting two applications from citizen handsets, and as pointed out by the man who built this pair of vanished applications – security researcher Jon Oberheide – the company can use the same persistent handset connection to install applications as well.

When Google announced that it had actually used its "kill switch" to remove Oberheide's applications, it didn't mention Oberheide – or his applications – by name. It merely said that it had removed "two free applications built by a security researcher for research purposes" and that "these applications intentionally misrepresented their purpose in order to encourage user downloads, but they were not designed to be used maliciously, and did not have permission to access private data — or system resources beyond permission.INTERNET."

The announcement came by way of a blog post from Android security lead Rich Cannings. "After the researcher voluntarily removed these applications from Android Market, we decided, per the Android Market Terms of Service, to exercise our remote application removal feature on the remaining installed copies to complete the cleanup," Cannings said.

With a blog post of his own, Oberheide – who works for the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based security startup Scio Security – later revealed that Google has removed a pair of applications he used to demonstrate how easy it would be to bootstrap a rootkit onto Android phones via the Android Market, Google's version of the App Store. Oberheide built an application dubbed RootStrap that periodically phoned home to retrieve native code that executed outside of Dalvik, the Android Java virtual machine. Then he distributed the tool through the Market in the guise of another application – Twilight Eclipse Preview – which purported to be a sneak peek of the upcoming Twilight teen vampire flick.

"An attacker could use such an approach to gain a large install base for a seemingly innocent application and then push down a local privilege escalation exploit as soon as a new vulnerability is discovered in the Linux kernel and root the device," Oberheide wrote. "Since carriers are fairly conservative in pushing out OTA [over the air] patches for their devices, an attacker could easily push out their malicious payload before the devices were patched."

Oberheide had delivered a talk on this proof-of-concept bootstrap at the SummerCon security conference in New York. The talk was written up by Forbes, and this alerted Google. Forbes quotes Google's Rich Cannings, who pointed out that unless they exploit a bug in the OS, Android apps are limited to the permissions set by users.

Though Google says that Oberheide voluntarily removed the apps from the Android Market, Oberheide tells The Reg that the company essentially told him that if he didn't remove them, they would be removed for him. He also tells us that Google alerted him before it started removing the apps from phones, but that he didn't receive the notification until after they'd been removed.

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.