Feeds

Mobile API standard puffs on last cigarette

OMTP sings WAC me up before you go go

Security for virtualized datacentres

Operator talking shop the Open Mobile Terminal Platform (OMTP) has sketched out its last three papers before it gets absorbed into the Wholesale Application Community.

The tasty bits of OMTP will get subsumed into the WAC, with the rest due to disappear into the GSMA and OMA from which much of it should probably never have emerged.

Folding the OMTP into the WAC is no surprise – there are too many initialled standards groups around at the moment, and at least the WAC has a clear agenda even if it is a necessarily optimistic one; that of taking on iTunes.

The OMTP was set up with the laudable intention of providing a set of cross-platform APIs through which operators could expose handset, and network, functionality to application developers. Back in 2004 that was going to be in Java, with the late-lamented SavaJe pushing the idea hard.

Since then the OMTP has floundered a bit, producing recommendation documents covering security, voicemail and all sorts of other odds and ends.

The last three – updates to Camera Maintenance, Visual Voicemail and Common Charger, are typical of the unfocused output of the talking shop. Some of the documents are valuable, and some even well written, but most of them ended up as discussion points which, in turn, led to more of the talking that mobile operator staff so enjoy.

In its BONDI project the OMTP found its original goal – cross-platform APIs exposing network and handset functionality, only in JavaScript rather than the original Java and suffering nothing from the change.

However, BONDI requires an authenticating body to sign approved applications, and the OMTP is poorly placed to provide that. So the operator's answer to iTunes, the WAC, takes over BONDI entirely while the other scraps drop into the Open Mobile Alliance (which already defines all sorts of things including MMS, WAP and such like) and the GSMA.

The OMTP's MD Tim Raby has already carved himself out a niche as interim CEO of the WAC, which should smooth the transition, but we'll have to wait until next month to get details of how the WAC is going to operate, and if it really can stand alongside iTunes. ®

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.