Feeds

Buyer's Guide: 3D TVs

Nice kit - but where's the content?

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Group Test The good news, as a Panasonic spokesman told me a couple of months ago, is that “there will be no format war” for 3D TV. It’s true that there are actually two different types of 3D television, but both types can play 3D TV broadcasts and films on 3D Blu-ray Discs, so you don’t have to worry about buying the wrong type of 3D TV and then being left with an expensive and obsolete piece of kit when one format wins out over the other.

LG 3D TV

3D TV: no format war - well, kind of...

There are currently four major companies preparing to launch 3D television sets this spring - LG, Panasonic, Sony and Samsung – with rivals Sharp, Philips and Toshiba also gearing up for launches later this year. With one exception – which I’ll come to in a moment – all these companies have standardised on a 3D system known as ‘active-shutter’ technology.

All 3D technology works by displaying two slightly different images on the screen – one for the left eye and another for the right eye. Your brain then merges the two images together to create the illusion of three-dimensional depth. Active-shutter televisions rapidly alternate between the two images, flicking from the right-eye image to the left-eye image in quick succession.

The glasses that you use with these TVs include a set of electronic ‘shutters’ – LCD lenses that alternately open and close the left and right eyepieces in sync with the alternating image on the TV screen.

Active Shutter Glasses

Active shut-out: don't assume Sony specs work with Samsung sets

A small transmitter, either built into the TV or connected to it over a cable, sends a signal to the glasses to ensure they expose the correct eye to the image being shown at that moment on the screen. The synchronisation process is automatic, so don't let anyone tell you you need to pay an engineer to link the two together for you.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Simplify SSL certificate management across the enterprise
Simple steps to take control of SSL across the enterprise, and recommendations for a management platform for full visibility and single-point of control for these Certificates.