Feeds

Yanks spend big on 3D

Europeans too

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Americans have already spent more than $55m on 3D TV and Blu-ray kit - despite a dearth of suitably stereoscopic material to play on them.

The total comes from local market watcher NPD, which yesterday said that all the money had been spent during the three months from February, when 3D kit announced at the January Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas began to appear on shop shelves.

Comparative European numbers are hard to come by - it's very early days for the technology, after all - but retail sales tracker GfK has said that some 25,000 3D TVs had been bought over here by the end of May.

To put that in context, GfK expects some 252 million TVs to be sold worldwide, this year.

Assume an average US price of $3000 per set, and that's only 18,333 TVs - less if the average price is higher and you assign more of the spend to Blu-ray products. From that perspective, European buyers appear keener on the technology than their transatlantic counterparts.

Still, the numbers show there is a keen early adopter market in both Europe and the US, even though there's relatively little 3D content available through broadcast channels or pre-recorded media yet.

For that reason, 3D will remain "a premium home entertainment experience" this year, NPD bigwig Ross Rubin noted.

And happy to buy expensive 3D equipment these early adopters may be, there are limits. More consumers surveyed by NPD - some 41 per cent - said the cost of the extra pairs of 3D glasses needed to allow groups of people to watch together was a key barrier to the adoption of 3D than those who said wearing 3D specs made them look silly - ten per cent.

That's in marked contrast to less self-confident Brits. In a recent survey, more than sixty-six per cent of respondents admitted they feel they'll look silly wearing 3D specs at home. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.