Feeds

100 Gigabit Ethernet standard ratified

Oh, and 40Gb/s too

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

It's official: the IEEE 802.3ba 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s Ethernet standard has been ratified by — who else? — the IEEE P802.3ba 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s Ethernet Task Force.

"Ubiquitous adoption of bandwidth-intensive technologies and applications, such as converged network services, video-on-demand, and social networking, is producing rapidly increasing demand for higher-rate throughput," the Task Force's chair, John D'Ambrosia, said in a prepared understatement.

Non-standard 100Gb/s setups have already appeared in the field — for example, the Dutch education networkers at SURFnet announced Monday that they had achieved 100Gb/s speeds on T Series Core Routers from Juniper Networks. GlobalQuotes notes that Cisco, Brocade, and Extreme Networks have also developed 100Gb/s Ethernet routers, cards, and switches.

But as was true after the long and painful 802.11n wireless networking standards process, developers of current 100Gb/s hardware shouldn't have a difficult time making the necessary tweaks — if any — to be fully 802.3ba-compliant.

Speaking of his company's product, for example, Juniper exec Luc Ceuppens told Techworld: "It is based on the standard as it was [in late 2009]. Changes made this year did not materially impact the product. I don't think we need to [modify] it."

One beneficiary of the standardization of 802.3ba will be 10Gb/s Ethernet. As 802.3ba interconnects find their way into data centers, those relatvely "slow" 10Gb/s Ethernet streams will find plenty of bandwidth for aggregation.

Everybody wins, according to David Law, chair of the IEEE 802.3 working group: "This is truly a forward-looking standard that will spur innovation at every point along the Ethernet value chain, as well as providing the essential architecture needed to facilitate greater broadband connectivity on a global scale,” he said.

Information on the 802.3ba standard can be found here. CDs with the standard will be available for purchase from the IEEE on Tuesday, and a PDF next Tuesday. ®

Bootnote

When Apple's Macintosh was released in January 1984, it was the first mass-market PC to have networking built in, with LocalTalk hardware transmitting info at 230.4Kb/s. The new 802.3ba standard supports throughput at a theoretical speed that's 434,027.8 times faster.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?