Feeds
75%
Nokia C5

Nokia C5

Compact candybar for avid texters

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Review Nokia’s lower end and mid range handsets might not offer the bells and whistles of the leading edge phones, but they can be solid workhorses. The C5 is a case in point. Just be aware when eyeing up the specs that its small screen means it can’t do some things nearly as well as bigger screened alternatives.

Nokia C5

Slimline satnav: Nokia's C5 includes Ovi Maps

This standard candybar handset weighs 89.3g and at 112 x 46 x 12.3mm, it is almost unnoticeable in a pocket. The metal backplate is a nice touch, while on the front silver highlights joined a two-tone grey and black colour scheme in my review sample. There is also a white version. Neither colour scheme is innovative, but pleasant enough.

The number pad is relatively large, each key is slightly domed and I was able to tap out texts at my maximum speed for a handset of this general design. Above the number pad are large Call, End and soft menu keys, while Home and Clear keys are tiny but raised from their surroundings and easy to hit.

The navpad is large enough, with a big central select button. Indeed, Nokia really does have the main ergonomics down to a fine art and while there’s nothing new here, the keys and overall layout work very well indeed.

None of this matters a jot if the specs and value for money points don’t add up, though. And at £169 you can’t expect leading edge stuff. This is a 3G handset with A-GPS but not Wi-Fi. Bluetooth is here, and there is a 3.5mm headset connector on the top of the chassis. Hence, the phone can sit perfectly in the pocket with no chance of snagging and ripping at connectors.

Nokia C5

The slot is on the right edge of the chassis

Nokia’s provided headset is satisfactory, although the flat in-ear buds refused to stay in my ears and a higher quality alternative set improved sound output considerably. The equaliser had practically no effect on sound output, as far as I could see. The FM radio has a generous 50 presets. With only 23 slots filled by downloading station data for the South East and London area, there’s plenty of room for expansion.

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?