Feeds

$11.7m judgment against Spamhaus slashed to $27,000

End of line for 6.6 billion-strong spammer

High performance access to file storage

A federal judge has handed a major victory to anti-spam crusaders Spamhaus, slashing an $11.7m verdict to just $27,002.

US Judge Charles P. Kocoras of the Eastern District of Illinois said the plaintiffs, e360 Insight and its founder David Linhardt, failed to credibly calculate the damage that resulted when its promotional emails were targeted by Spamhaus. e360 sued Spamhaus in 2006 alleging defamation, tortious interference with prospective economic advantage and interference with existing contracts.

e360 claimed that about 3 billion of the more than 6.6 billion emails it sent on behalf of clients were blocked by service providers who subscribed to the Spamhaus real-time blacklist. The court ruled in e360's favor after the volunteer anti-spam group withdrew from the case. A judgment of $11.7m was ultimately entered against Spamhaus.

An appeals court ultimately junked that ruling and sent the question of damages back to the lower court. At a trial in March, e360 argued once again it was entitled to astronomical damages that at different points was calculated at $135m, $122m, and $30m. Kocoras rejected all three amounts.

“None of these figures was the product of expert testimony or use of a scientific or reliable methodology, nor based on relevant or supportable factual premises,” he wrote in a decision issued on Friday. “As a result, none of the above amounts can be relied on or be a reasonable basis upon which to base a damage award.”

The judge went on to award e360 $27,000 for interference with existing contracts the company had with three clients, a sum the judge found to be equal to one month of additional work on behalf of the customers. He awarded just $1 apiece on the other two claims, and he said that claims calculated under the defamation part of 3360's case were “speculative and conclusory.” Kocoras also turned down 360's request for a court order barring Spamhaus from engaging in similar behavior against e360 in the future.

It's the latest high-stakes ruling to be issued in a spam case. A decision in a separate case last month awarded $2.6m, while another ruling awarded the same alleged spammer 807,000. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn
Installing random interwebs shiz will bork your zombie box
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.