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Apple apologizes for iPhone 4 gaffe

What's the plural of 'snafu'?

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On Wednesday morning, Apple released a straightforward apology for Tuesday's series of iPhone 4 pre-order cock-ups.

As The Reg reported Tuesday, prospective buyers in both the US and the UK — at minimum — found themselves unable to order the next must-have Jobsian device due to server overload, either in Cupertino, at the carrier level, or both.

Apple's statement, in its entirety:

Yesterday Apple and its carrier partners took pre-orders for more than 600,000 of Apple’s new iPhone 4. It was the largest number of pre-orders Apple has ever taken in a single day and was far higher than we anticipated, resulting in many order and approval system malfunctions. Many customers were turned away or abandoned the process in frustration. We apologize to everyone who encountered difficulties, and hope that they will try again or visit an Apple or carrier store once the iPhone 4 is in stock.

Ah, Apple — it can get ink even for admitting its poor planning.

Still and all, the statement's wording is more explanation than excuse, and for that we give credit where credit is due. ®

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