Feeds

Police confirm cybercrime budget cut

Hello, hello, goodbye

Build a business case: developing custom apps

The Metropolitan Police have confirmed their budget for battling cybercrime nationally has been slashed by the Home Office.

The Register revealed on Friday that central government funding for the Police Central eCrime Unit (PCeU) had been quietly cut by 30 per cent.

A spokeswoman for the Met said the PCeU had been targeted as part of the coalition government's initial £6bn batch of cuts, announced on 24 May.

"It has been confirmed that the Police Central e-crime Unit (PCeU) will not receive the planned £1m uplift in funding from the Home Office next year," she said.

According to original spending plans, the PCeU was due to receive £3.5m from the Home Office next year.

"Funding will remain at the same level as for 2009/10," said the Met.

Along with other senior officers, Janet Williams, the Met deputy assistant commissioner in charge of PCeU and national cybercrime policing policy through ACPO, argued that the unit was underfunded when it was set up and called for expansion. The deep cut less than two years into its operations means it will not reach even its originally planned capability.

"The planned uplift in funding was to improve our ACPO national mainstream law enforcement capability, as well as providing essential training and crucial IT infrastructure within the PCeU," said the Met's spokeswoman.

"Without this additional funding the growth of our capability will be restricted, however we remain committed to our existing work in this area at current funding levels."

The Met will also divert some of its own funds to the unit to make up some - but nowhere near all - of the shortfall.

Cuts are expected across policing following the Budget next week, but the fact that the fight against the multibillion-pound cybercrime industry was sacrificed to the very first swing of the axe will be interpreted to mean that despite successes - and pre-election rhetoric - the issue is still viewed as a low priority in Whitehall. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA
Mr Burns vs. The Chocolate Factory, round three!
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Know what Ferguson city needs right now? It's not Anonymous doxing random people
U-turn on vow to identify killer cop after fingering wrong bloke
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.