Feeds

Lone workers will like being tracked, says Orange

It makes me feel safe when you watch me sleep, Edward

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Orange is pushing out research claiming that UK lone-worker staff would love to be tracked using GPS, for their own benefit of course.

The research, based on interviews with a thousand people who defined themselves as “lone workers”, found that only 12 per cent have an alert button to use in case of incident, while 38 per cent appear to endorse GPS-based tracking.

We say “appear” as Orange words the endorsement with great care: first listing the advantages of GPS tracking, and then expounding that almost 40 per cent of lone workers “feel positive about their employer having the ability to be alerted quickly if they were to miss or be significantly delayed at an appointment”. One might argue that isn't necessarily the same thing as being tracked by the boss.

More surprising, to us at least, is that only 75 per cent of lone workers have company-issued mobile phones, while just over 40 per cent get a laptop and mobile internet access.

Some of those will be postmen and crossing guards*, who probably don't need Google for their daily grind, but it's hard to imagine many people in full-time employment don't have a mobile phone these days, even if it's not a company issue.

The 12 per cent figure also worries us slightly. While someone who climbs telegraph poles for a living might need an instant alert (or, even better, a phone that automatically screams when falling), those of us to whom a work-related injury means spilt coffee can probably survive without calling the emergency services at the touch of a button.

But if you're alone at work, and in physical danger, then Orange would like you to know it has technology that might be able to make you a bit safer... though probably not as safe as you would be if you weren't alone or in physical danger. ®

* Yes, they do still exist - there just aren't as many as there used to be.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more
Oh yeah ... and a 30% cut for Amazon to seal the deal
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Nintend-OH NO! Sorry, Mario – your profits are in another castle
Red-hatted mascot, red-colored logo, red-stained finance books
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?