Feeds

Adobe euthanizes Flash 10.1 for 64-bit Linux

'Expects' 64bitness later

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Adobe has murdered Flash for 64-bit Linux. At least for the moment.

On Thursday, the company took the beta tag off the 32-bit Flash Player 10.1 for Windows, Linux, and Mac, and it released a slew of security updates for versions 10.0.45.2 and earlier. But at the same time, it posted a statement to the Adobe Labs page announcing the end of the Flash 10.1 for 64-bit Linux beta.

However, the company says it intends to offer 64-bit Linux support in a future release.

"The Flash Player 10.1 64-bit Linux beta is closed," the statement reads. "We remain committed to delivering 64-bit support in a future release of Flash Player. No further information is available at this time. Please feel free to continue your discussions on the Flash Player 10.1 desktop forums."

Ah, but if you visit the desktop forums, you're told not to discuss 64-bit Linux Flash, and you're pointed to the 64-bit Linux forum. And as a Slashdotter points out, the 64-bit forum has been set to read-only. "Like in a Kafka novel," says another Slashdotter. "I'm not sure whether I should laugh or cry... but it reminds me of reading The Trial."

Meanwhile, others have no intention of crying. "That's one down," reads the first comment, as Slahsdot points to the death of the 64-bit Linux player. "Now, get them to cancel flash on i386 Linux, then on MacOS, then Windows, and we'll be all set."

This does not appear to come from Steve Jobs.

Though it has closed the Flash 10.1 for 64-bit Linux beta, Adobe tells us that it still intends to offer 64-bit Linux support in a future version of the player. "We remain committed to bringing native 64-bit Flash Player for desktop operating systems," the company says. "We expect to provide native support for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux 64-bit platforms in an upcoming major release of Flash Player." ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.