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Microsoft says XP netbooks die on October 22

There's always China

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Microsoft has reminded OEMs that as of October 22, it will forbid them from loading Windows XP on netbooks.

But if you still want one, there's always China.

In a Thursday blog post, Redmond underlined this October deadline, which was first laid down back April 2008. According to research outfit NPD, Microsoft says, 81 percent of US netbooks sold via retail come preloaded with Windows 7, but some OEMs are still punting Windows XP, which is available at a considerably cheaper price.

All About Microsoft blogger Mary Jo Foley says that according to sources, Microsoft sells XP at $15 a pop and Windows 7 at $50. Foley says that Win 7 netbooks have stayed cheap despite that price increase, but independent research suggests that the netbook has plateaued of late.

Microsoft has also reminded the world that on July 13 it will no longer offer support for Windows XP SP2. If you still want help with XP, you'll have to upgrade to SP3.

Windows XP is the operating system that Microsoft built before it started abusing PC buyers with Windows Vista. ®

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