Feeds

Slack backup leaves Brits exposed to data loss

The virus ate my holiday snaps

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

UK consumers often store valuable data only on their computers without backing it up, inviting disaster if hardware failure or malware infection strikes.

Around a third (31 per cent) of 3,000 people surveyed in a new poll have lost important or irreplaceable information that they trusted to their PC. The survey, commissioned by net security firm AVG and run by onepoll.com, also identified the top five reasons people lose information

  1. Hardware malfunction – 45 per cent
  2. Virus – 26 per cent
  3. Human error – 11 per cent
  4. Damage to computer – eight per cent
  5. Power cut – five per cent

AVG is keen to emphasise the role security software can play in helping to prevent malware from chewing through vital data such as music, pictures, and security and financial information. Is it talking about any particular strain of malware here? No, apparently not, just the general risk.

Music downloads from the likes of iTunes can be restored here so the problem the survey highlights, which is genuine enough, seems to focus on data such as personal documents, emails and perhaps photos. On average, UK consumers have more than 600 important photographs stored on a single computer. Four in five (78 per cent) of us have completely irreplaceable pictures stored with no copies backed up or printed elsewhere. The poll found Brits valued holiday snaps and family pictures above other content.

Users should back up this data regularly if they don't want to be faced with an expensive data recovery job if and when things go wrong. The poll found nearly half of us (47 per cent) have lost content that they would pay at least £250 to retrieve.

Simon Steggles, a director at computer forensics and data recovery firm Disklabs, said that many data recovery jobs it handles are the result of malware rather than damaged hardware. PC data recovery jobs its experts handle are split 50/50 between hardware/software problems, though software issues are not all down to malware, he explained. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.