Feeds
80%
Sony BDV-E370

Sony BDV-E370 Blu-ray home cinema kit

See no evil, hear no evil

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Also, connection to your network is Ethernet only, as there’s no onboard Wi-Fi. However, a Wi-Fi adaptor is available as a pricey add-on – around £70. Thankfully, unlike the older E300 that this model replaces, there are now two USB ports, with one conveniently mounted on the front for easy access. Also, you can now hook an iPod up to one of these to play back your media through the system.

Sony BDV-E370

Sony's XMB navigation does the job, but it's not to everyone's taste

As with most of Sony’s latest AV kit, the E370 is driven using the Xross Media Bar (XMB) menu system. While opinions vary on XMB, overall, I found it makes the player very quick and easy to navigate around, especially when you’re browsing through the supported online video services like Five On Demand and Eurosport, which are neatly presented and work extremely well.

You can also play a range of audio, picture and video file formats including Xvid and MKV video files at resolutions of up to 1080p from either optical discs or drives connected to either of the USB ports. Annoyingly, however, you currently can’t stream files across a network, although Sony says a forthcoming software upgrade will deliver DNLA support.

Sony BDV-E370

A range of online video services are supported including Eurosport, LoveFilm and Youtube

The BDV-E370 actually has two standby modes, a fast start mode and a standard mode. With fast start enabled the machine draws a hefty 11W in standby, but with it turned off this is reduced to just 0.7W, and while its running at full tilt, it sucks in around 30W, which is pretty much par for the course.

When it comes to actually playing discs the BDV-E370 is an impressive performer. It’s quick to startup and load Blu-rays and the pictures it produces are simply gorgeous. It conjures up stunning levels of detail and delivers images with vivid colours and real cinematic punch. It does a great job of upscaling standard definition DVDs too, adding extra sharpness while keeping any nasty artefacts like jaggies in check.

Sony BDV E370

The essential guide to IT transformation

Next page: Verdict

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
Intel unleashed octo-core speed demon for the power-crazed crowd
Haswell-E processors designed for gamers and workstation crowds
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
Tim Cook in Applerexia fears: New MacBook THINNER THAN EVER
'Supply chain sources' give up the goss on new iLappy
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?