Feeds

Romanian boffin touts 1PB holographic disk tech

Ceramic-glass objects for the millennia

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Another holographic hopeful has emerged, Storex Technologies, which claims its Hyper CD technology can produce a 1PB optical disk.

It was only a couple of years ago that Call/Recall was proposing a 1TB drive and GE was suggesting it could produce a 500GB unit last year. InPhase had to be rescued after its long-lived attempt to get a 300GB Tapestry drive into production failed. Now here comes Storex with a 1PB technology. Are these numbers plucked out of thin air?

Storex Technologies was founded by Romanian scientist Eugen Pavel in 2007 and is, in effect, a technology demonstration looking for a partner to productise its intellectual property. Pavel is a reputable scientist and we are told that he "has done extensive research in the field of fluorescent photosensitive glasses and glass-ceramics.

"The company holds patents on glass and glass-ceramics compositions as well as read/write mechanics and optics concept(s) applicable to high-density data storage. Using commercially available low power lasers and optics, capacities of more than 1,000,000 GB (1 PB) can be achieved using a CD size disk of 120mm in diameter and 1.2mm thick."

So it's more than a petabyte now.

The idea is based on the controlled fluorescence intensity of 40nm-sized signals being used to record information inside the virtual layers of a CD-sized fluorescent photosensitive glass, or glass-ceramic discs using laser diodes. The layers are said to be 700nm apart - we don't know how many layers there are. Data access is said to occur at DVD-like speed.

Storex claims a 5,000 year life for the disks. This is probably theoretically true but there is no product, no demonstrated and proven drive and no demonstrated and proven media, so you can consider this claim marketing hyperbole for now.

Pavel, Storex's CEO, was scheduled to present a paper on his Petabyte Optical Disc at the Optical Data Storage 2010 conference, but that slot is now labelled as cancelled.

This is all very early-stage stuff, and in an area littered with previous attempts to bring multi-hundred gigabyte holographic disks and drives to market. It hasn't happened yet but there are people, like the InPhase rescuers, and Pavel himself, who sincerely hold the holographic faith. Good luck to them. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
The cloud that goes puff: Seagate Central home NAS woes
4TB of home storage is great, until you wake up to a dead device
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery
The race for next generation flash capacity now on
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.