Feeds

Intel answers Microsoft's Linux 'noise' with MeeGo show

Wintel partners vie to be next Apple

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Microsoft and Intel are fighting for the affections of hardware makers as the PC industry tries to answer Apple's iPad.

The world's biggest software company used the annual Computex show in Taiwan to release a preview of Windows Embedded Compact 7 — the latest rebranded version of Windows CE, which has been promised on tablets from Asus, LG, and MSI.

Windows Embedded Compact 7 is Flash-friendly — unlike Apple's tablet. It will offer email, calendar, contacts synchronization with Exchange, Microsoft Office and Adobe PDF viewers, and synchronization with Windows 7 machines. The OS will be released to manufacturing during the fourth quarter.

Microsoft released Windows Embedded Compact 7 preview with a tough message for Linux: Windows will win the heart of PC makers.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Steve Guggenheimer, corporate vice president of Microsoft's OEM division, pointed out that although Linux had an early lead on netbooks, Windows has now become the dominant operating system for these machines.

"There are always lots of noises at the beginning of a new category," he said. Guggenheimer packed his message with boilerplate about the hidden costs of a "free" operating system. This was a reference to Google's Linux-based Android, but the message was equally applicable to MeeGo, which merged Linux efforts from Intel and Nokia this year and hit version 1.0 last week.

Elsewhere at Computex, Intel fought back by showing MeeGo running on a low-power, Atom processor-based device.

David Perlmutter, the vice president and co-general manager of Intel Architecture Group, offered hardware makers a chip roadmap designed to show Intel's commitment. OEMs have every right to be wary of committing to a mobile Linux OS given that past efforts haven't always panned out.

Perlmutter announced mobile dual-core Atom processors codenamed Oak Trail, due in early 2011. Oak Trail will be optimized for tablets and netbooks, consume 50 per cent less power, and provide full HD-video playback, according to Intel. It will also work with Windows, Google's planned Chrome browser-based operating system, and — significantly — MeeGo.

Early signs were encouraging for MeeGo, at least on the software side. Linux company Linpus announced plans to for a MeeGo-based version of its Linux Lite optimized for Atom processors and featuring improved power management, while PC and server Linux outfits Mandriva, Red Flag, and Turbolinux announced plans for distros based on MeeGo for devices.

Enterprise server staple Novell is also slimming down with the SuSE MeeGo based on MeeGo 1.0 for netbooks and devices. Novell expects SuSE MeeGo to be pre-installed in a variety of devices during the next year.

Hardware makers were less visible in the front line of early supporters, although two important names did wade in. Acer, committed to Google's Chrome and already delivering Windows and Linux netbooks, plans MeeGo-based netbooks in 2010. Asus, while planning a Chrome device of its own, will ship MeeGo machines in 2011, and it will offer an ASUS App Store running on Intel's AppUp Centre.

Clearly aware that MeeGo has piqued the interest of developers and software partners, Intel said its work now lies in getting hardware in the hands of users. Peter Biddle, director of Intel's AppUp products and services told ZDnet Asia: "We need more consumers!" ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.