Feeds

Adobe unveils emag maker for Apple iPad

Flashless rag tech graces sacred App Store

High performance access to file storage

Adobe has announced the first step in its ambitious effort to move beyond the web and into app-based digital content delivery, and the poster child for its first foray runs on a magical and revolutionary device from Adobe's derisive frenemy, Apple.

Tuesday's announcement of magazine viewer technology is but one step in Adobe's overarching Digital Publishing Platform effort, which will eventually extend to cross-platform app delivery of magazines, books, newpapers, and retail catalogs, but which for now is limited to one magazine on the iPad.

That proof-of-concept app is the five-dollar iPad version of the June issue of Wired, developed in a collaboration between that magazine and Adobe, and which became available on the iTunes App Store last weekend:

"We expect to use this technology to deliver more of our publications over the coming months," said Thomas Wallace, editorial director of Condé Nast, Wired's parent company — which seems a bit less than a thoroughgoing commitment to a continuing embrace of the digital publishing platform.

Chris Anderson, Wired's editor in chief, was more definitive, saying in an editor's letter that "Wired magazine will be digital from now on." Boss Wallace, however, might now be more decisive, considering that as of Tuesday morning, the app ranked number two among the App Store's top paid iPad apps and that the Store's brain trust has selected it as iPad App of the Week.

Adobe says that the Digital Publishing Platform will be based on a combination of its Creative Suite 5, which it launched in April of this year, and technologies from the "web analytics and online business optimization software and services" company Omniture, which it acquired for $1.8bn last October. At its creative core is Adobe's latest version of its QuarkXPress-killer, InDesign CS5.

"It's safe to say that if you are already working in InDesign CS5, you'll be well on your way to producing a beautiful digital version of your publication," said David Burkett, Adobe vice president and general manager of Creative Solutions.

The magazine viewer software has not yet been released to developers, but according to Adobe's Digital Publishing Platform roadmap (PDF), it's due this summer at Adobe Labs. Cross-platform support is scheduled to arrive this fall, along with News Reader SDK 3.0 and Reader Mobile SDK 9.2.

A Digital Publishing Platform FAQ notes that to use the platform, you'll need Adobe InDesign CS5 — which isn't exactly an impulse purchase, whether it's sold standalone at $699 or as part of the CS5 Design Premium suite at $1,899.

And, no, Apple isn't making a Flash exception by allowing the Wired app into its App Store store. The Digital Publishing Platform generates applications in Objective C, as per Apple's demands. As the FAQ notes that "Adobe will continue to develop a solution written in Objective-C according to the rules specified by the Apple Developers License Agreement," and that "Adobe is pursuing a multiplatform development strategy that will include Objective-C for the iPad and the Adobe AIR runtime for the desktop and other mobile platforms." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Video games make you NASTY AND VIOLENT
Especially if you are bad at them and keep losing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style
Biometrics and kid-friendly mode in back-to-basics blockbuster
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.