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Eurovision website goes titsup, upsets handful of fans

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The Eurovision Song Contest kicks off tomorrow night, but viewers wishing to do some homework on the contestants ahead of the live final will be disappointed as the official website has been titsup for more than 10 hours.

Helpfully Auntie has its very own dedicated Eurovision webpage, which should assist Eurovision junkies who can't get their fix from the official source.

It's unclear what's gone wrong with Eurovision's site, but at least 12 people have complained about it being offline via Twitter and we've had an opportunistic press release from Zeus Technology too.

"The rise in popularity of social networking tools such as Twitter also means it doesn’t take long for the world to know when an outage like this occurs," said the company's infrastructure specialist Nick Bond before shoehorning in this comment: "Although not all outages can be planned for, companies can take simple steps to ensure services do not collapse under the weight of peaks in demand.”

We put several calls in to the European Broadcasting Union, which owns the domain name Eurovision.tv, but no one picked up the phone.

Tomorrow's contest takes place in Oslo, Norway. For those among you who care about the show - which will as usual be broadcast live by the BBC and hosted by Graham Norton - the UK contestant is Josh Dubovie, a 19-year-old lad from Essex.

The British hopeful will be warbling a Peter Waterman, Mike Stock and Steve Crosby song entitled That Sounds Good to Me.

We at Vulture Central are putting our money on Latvian hopeful Aisha, who will be performing What For? (Only Mr. God Knows Why). ®

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