Feeds

NoSQL relationship graph straddles six degrees of separation

Kevin Bacon and you

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Data management and persistent object-store veteran Objectivity reckons it can now connect you to actor Kevin Bacon using NoSQL.

The company's started beta testing its NoSQL InfiniteGraph graph database and API, which it said can search billions of connections and relationships in massive volumes of complex data. The beta is due to run six weeks, with the general release for mid-July.

InfiniteGraph DB examines relationships in data points, like people on LinkedIn, in order to find extended connections. Objectivity reckoned InfiniteGraph can find connections between people in a LinkedIn, for example, who are between five and seven degrees removed.

Objectivity is chasing large social networks that want to charge premium rates for their services and ads companies that want to track people and their relationships to serve cookies.

InfiniteGraph map is already being used by the CIA and Department of Defense running on top of the existing Objectivity/DB database and analysis engine, and it sounds like the architecture has been built through Objectivity's engagements with these customers.

InfiniteGraph works by storing relationship information in the data and acting as a federated data store instead of using table joins and tables or rows to connect different data points - as you would using a traditional relational-database architecture at scale.

Jay Jarrell, president and chief executive, told The Reg: "The graph problem is the tough one where many to many to many relationships are joined."

InfiniteGraph will looks for pathways between people, such as phone calls and emails, to make connections. The system has a plug-in that can pull in SQL data from Oracle, DB2, Sybase and other databases and that plugs into distributed data crunching architecture Hadoop. Plug-ins for other SQL and NoSQL databases will be provided according to demand.

InfiniteGraph will be available as a free edition, priced at $999 for an annual subscription and $1,999 for a perpetual license plus 20 per cent for maintenance and support. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.