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NoSQL relationship graph straddles six degrees of separation

Kevin Bacon and you

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Data management and persistent object-store veteran Objectivity reckons it can now connect you to actor Kevin Bacon using NoSQL.

The company's started beta testing its NoSQL InfiniteGraph graph database and API, which it said can search billions of connections and relationships in massive volumes of complex data. The beta is due to run six weeks, with the general release for mid-July.

InfiniteGraph DB examines relationships in data points, like people on LinkedIn, in order to find extended connections. Objectivity reckoned InfiniteGraph can find connections between people in a LinkedIn, for example, who are between five and seven degrees removed.

Objectivity is chasing large social networks that want to charge premium rates for their services and ads companies that want to track people and their relationships to serve cookies.

InfiniteGraph map is already being used by the CIA and Department of Defense running on top of the existing Objectivity/DB database and analysis engine, and it sounds like the architecture has been built through Objectivity's engagements with these customers.

InfiniteGraph works by storing relationship information in the data and acting as a federated data store instead of using table joins and tables or rows to connect different data points - as you would using a traditional relational-database architecture at scale.

Jay Jarrell, president and chief executive, told The Reg: "The graph problem is the tough one where many to many to many relationships are joined."

InfiniteGraph will looks for pathways between people, such as phone calls and emails, to make connections. The system has a plug-in that can pull in SQL data from Oracle, DB2, Sybase and other databases and that plugs into distributed data crunching architecture Hadoop. Plug-ins for other SQL and NoSQL databases will be provided according to demand.

InfiniteGraph will be available as a free edition, priced at $999 for an annual subscription and $1,999 for a perpetual license plus 20 per cent for maintenance and support. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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