Feeds

NoSQL relationship graph straddles six degrees of separation

Kevin Bacon and you

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Data management and persistent object-store veteran Objectivity reckons it can now connect you to actor Kevin Bacon using NoSQL.

The company's started beta testing its NoSQL InfiniteGraph graph database and API, which it said can search billions of connections and relationships in massive volumes of complex data. The beta is due to run six weeks, with the general release for mid-July.

InfiniteGraph DB examines relationships in data points, like people on LinkedIn, in order to find extended connections. Objectivity reckoned InfiniteGraph can find connections between people in a LinkedIn, for example, who are between five and seven degrees removed.

Objectivity is chasing large social networks that want to charge premium rates for their services and ads companies that want to track people and their relationships to serve cookies.

InfiniteGraph map is already being used by the CIA and Department of Defense running on top of the existing Objectivity/DB database and analysis engine, and it sounds like the architecture has been built through Objectivity's engagements with these customers.

InfiniteGraph works by storing relationship information in the data and acting as a federated data store instead of using table joins and tables or rows to connect different data points - as you would using a traditional relational-database architecture at scale.

Jay Jarrell, president and chief executive, told The Reg: "The graph problem is the tough one where many to many to many relationships are joined."

InfiniteGraph will looks for pathways between people, such as phone calls and emails, to make connections. The system has a plug-in that can pull in SQL data from Oracle, DB2, Sybase and other databases and that plugs into distributed data crunching architecture Hadoop. Plug-ins for other SQL and NoSQL databases will be provided according to demand.

InfiniteGraph will be available as a free edition, priced at $999 for an annual subscription and $1,999 for a perpetual license plus 20 per cent for maintenance and support. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.