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iPhone 3G disappears from cellco sites

So last year...

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Suspicions that the iPhone 3G is not long for this world would appear to be founded - if UK carriers' websites are anything to go by.

O2, for example, isn't offering the 3G as an option at all. Whether you're after a pay-monthly package or a pay-as-you-go deal, you can get the iPhone 3GS but not its predecessor.

Orange does list the 3G, but if you attempt to order one you'll be told it's out of stock.

Carphone Warehouse similarly lists the 3G as a possible iPhone choice, but, when pushed, admits it hasn't got any.

Vodafone has the iPhone 3G on its virtual shop shelves, but the site won't tell you if the device is available until you key in your payment details.

The iPhone 4G is expected to be announced on 7 June, introduced on that day by Steve Jobs during his Apple Worldwide Developers Conference keynote speech.

It's no coincidence, we're sure, that Dell will be launching its first mobile internet device, the 5in Streak on the same day.

The arrival of the 4G will surely see the end of the 3G, now almost two years old and unable to support all the features of iPhone OS 4.0 which is also expected to be launched by Jobs. ®

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