Feeds

Another Flash-only NAS? Come on in

Solid Access UNAS makes it a bit crowded in here

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Two's company but three is becoming a crowd: Solid Access has launched a NAND flash-only NAS storage product, the UNAS 100, offering 300,000 IOPS and 1,000MB/sec bandwidth.

This joins Nimbus Data Systems' S-Class and WhipTail, with its Racerunner Virtual Desktop XLR8R, in offering a flash-only storage array at reasonable prices.

The UNAS box is a 2U rackmount enclosure holding 1.4TB or 2.4TB of single-level-cell (SLC) flash made up from 300GB usable-capacity drives, and connected to the outside world by a dual-port 10Gbit/E NIC. The smaller capacity one has a 64GB RAM cache while its big brother enjoys a 96GB RAM cache. The bandwidth is steady-state, not a burst-mode peak. Another performance point is that the latency is less than 10 microseconds.

Before 2010 the only diskless storage arrays were expensive, very fast and largish DRAM and NAND boxes from the likes of Texas Memory Systems and Violin Memory. We have now had three flash-based, diskless storage products announced in just a few weeks. The Nimbus one uses multi-level cell flash, while the WhipTail and Solid Access products use faster SLC.

It is becoming apparent that if you want to bridge the drive array I/O lag compared to what servers can accept, then the short-stroking multiple Fibre Channel spindles tactic entered its end-of-life phase when EMC announced its Enterprise Flash Drives.

Now it appears that Fibre Channel drive arrays in general could be replaced by flash arrays, and the NetApp view of drive arrays evolving to flash for IOPS and SATA for capacity is going to become reality, with that evolution starting this year.

Which array vendor will be first off the starting blocks in offering a two-tier array: flash for speed, and SATA drives for space? Will it be one of the five majors: EMC, Dell, HP, IBM or NetApp, or one of the many minors: 3PAR, BlueArc, Compellent, DataDirect, Fujitsu, Pillar, LSI, Oracle/Sun, or Xiotech? While they wait, Nimbus, Solid Access and WhipTail can sell unchallenged by any competition on the performance front.

Thanks to StorageSearch for pointing out the Solid Access product.

Chas Chesler, Solid Access Technologies' sales director, said the UNAS 100 supports NFS, CIFS and Samba. The 1.2TB model is $70,000 while the 2.4TB one is $125,000. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Cutting cancer rates: Data, models and a happy ending?
How surgery might be making cancer prognoses worse
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?