Feeds

Hitachi Maxell demos 50TB capacity LTO-class tape

Perpendicular magnetic recording comes to tape

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Hitachi Maxell has demonstrated a 50TB capacity LTO-class tape using perpendicular magnetic recording technology.

This is 400 per cent more than the raw capacity of the highest-capacity tape on the LTO roadmap, the 12.8TB LTO-8.

Hard disk drives have used perpendicular magnetic recording for some years and its limitations are now forecast to cause a transition to bit-patterned media or heat-assisted magnetic recording in a few years time.

The demonstration was a joint one by Hitachi Maxell and The Tokyo Institute of Technology. Hitachi Maxell says the current method of coating a tape's base layer with powdered magnetic grains faces difficulties in getting down to 10nm or less grain diameter, whereas that is possible using a "Facing Targets Sputtering" technology from the Tokyo Institute.

Hitachi Maxell sputtering method

What happens in a sputtering process is that atoms are ejected from a solid material and form a thin film on the surface of a substrate.

We're told that this sputtering is done "at room temperature without a substrate cooling system. Fine composite films, which couldn’t be prepared by previously used magnetron sputtering methods, can be formed by facing targets sputtering, thanks to damage-less formation of films on a very thin plastic film with separated plasma from the film."

The tape was given a low-noise, laminated soft magnetic underlayer. The recording layer was then sputtered onto that to create a linear formatted perpendicular magnetic recording medium, a super-high density, nanometer-sized magnetic film with an areal density of up to 45Gbit/sq in. Applying this density to an LTO-5 size tape, in terms of width and length, results in a greater than 50TB capacity.

That capacity is 33 times greater than the raw capacity of LTO-5 tape, 1.4TB.

The total thickness of the recording layer, protective layer and underlayers is about 100nm.

The facing targets sputtering method was developed by associate professor Shigeki Nakagawa et al in the department of physical electronics, part of the graduate school of engineering at the Tokyo Institute.

What this means is that, in theory, the way is clear to use current physical-size LTO tape reels, and hence cartridges, as the LTO roadmap progresses. At some point there will likely be a switch from coated media to perpendicularly recorded media and at that point backwards compatibility, a feature of LTO technology, will be tested, as the drive heads will have to be able to read both types of media for backwards compatibility to work. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.