Feeds

Hitachi Maxell demos 50TB capacity LTO-class tape

Perpendicular magnetic recording comes to tape

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Hitachi Maxell has demonstrated a 50TB capacity LTO-class tape using perpendicular magnetic recording technology.

This is 400 per cent more than the raw capacity of the highest-capacity tape on the LTO roadmap, the 12.8TB LTO-8.

Hard disk drives have used perpendicular magnetic recording for some years and its limitations are now forecast to cause a transition to bit-patterned media or heat-assisted magnetic recording in a few years time.

The demonstration was a joint one by Hitachi Maxell and The Tokyo Institute of Technology. Hitachi Maxell says the current method of coating a tape's base layer with powdered magnetic grains faces difficulties in getting down to 10nm or less grain diameter, whereas that is possible using a "Facing Targets Sputtering" technology from the Tokyo Institute.

Hitachi Maxell sputtering method

What happens in a sputtering process is that atoms are ejected from a solid material and form a thin film on the surface of a substrate.

We're told that this sputtering is done "at room temperature without a substrate cooling system. Fine composite films, which couldn’t be prepared by previously used magnetron sputtering methods, can be formed by facing targets sputtering, thanks to damage-less formation of films on a very thin plastic film with separated plasma from the film."

The tape was given a low-noise, laminated soft magnetic underlayer. The recording layer was then sputtered onto that to create a linear formatted perpendicular magnetic recording medium, a super-high density, nanometer-sized magnetic film with an areal density of up to 45Gbit/sq in. Applying this density to an LTO-5 size tape, in terms of width and length, results in a greater than 50TB capacity.

That capacity is 33 times greater than the raw capacity of LTO-5 tape, 1.4TB.

The total thickness of the recording layer, protective layer and underlayers is about 100nm.

The facing targets sputtering method was developed by associate professor Shigeki Nakagawa et al in the department of physical electronics, part of the graduate school of engineering at the Tokyo Institute.

What this means is that, in theory, the way is clear to use current physical-size LTO tape reels, and hence cartridges, as the LTO roadmap progresses. At some point there will likely be a switch from coated media to perpendicularly recorded media and at that point backwards compatibility, a feature of LTO technology, will be tested, as the drive heads will have to be able to read both types of media for backwards compatibility to work. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Free virtual appliance for wire data analytics
The ExtraHop Discovery Edition is a free virtual appliance will help you to discover the performance of your applications across the network, web, VDI, database, and storage tiers.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.