Feeds
75%
TEAC R-4iDNT

Teac R-4iDNT Wi-Fi/DAB/FM radio and iPod dock

Log on, tune in, dock out

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Review Despite the UK’s proposed analogue radio switch-off at some yet-to-be-decided date, it’s fair to say that DAB has hardly been a roaring success. Most digital radio manufacturers hedge their bets and include an FM tuner, while there’s a growing trend of adding an Internet connection for accessing thousands of online stations in a handy radio-style device.

TEAC R-4iDNT

Teac's R-4iDNT: no snazzy colour touchscreens here

The new R-4iDNT from Japanese audio brand Teac is one such hybrid. Reflecting that people will listen to radio from various sources along with a potentially vast music library from an MP3 player or computer, this neat box tunes into FM, DAB, streams from computers and the Internet or simply docks an iPod.

Connections are basic but include the aforementioned socket for iPods (with iPhone compatibility) and a mini-jack auxiliary input. There’s Wi-Fi reception plus an Ethernet port for a wired network. Unlike some digital radios, the R-4iDNT lacks built-in flash memory, card slots or a USB port for storage drives, so you can’t do any recording or playback this way.

Setting up is easy, with an installation wizard guiding you through the trickier parts, such as wireless networking. Fortunately the Netgear router I was using had a ‘Push'n'Connect’ button, so I could skip the password, though there are manual options for this and finding networks by name.

The R-4iDNT has dual alarm timers and an illuminated sleep/snooze button, should you want to put it by the bed. When plonked on a tabletop it’s only 53mm high but it has a phonebook-sized footprint. If surface space is an issue it can be wall-mounted using two screws.

TEAC R-4iDNT

A simple line-up of sockets including Ethernet in case you don’t want to use Wi-Fi

The backlit LCD display sits within a sloping front edge, so it’s fine for viewing either way up. However, if you wall-mount then any docked iPod sticks out precariously as if about to make a suicidal jump, possibly in response to your musical taste. The designers should really have put an extra connection at the back or made the dock pivotable.

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax
Without representation, too. Time for a Boston (Lincs) Macbook Party?
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple ran off to IBM
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Apple gets patent for WRIST-PUTER: iTime for a smartwatch
It does everything a smartwatch should do ... but Apple owns it
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.