Feeds

DAB lobby launches radio scrappage scheme

Trade-in your tranny

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

This weekend you can trade in your trannies and recycle your radios in exchange for money off brand spanking new digital tuners.

Well, so the digital radio industry hopes, as it strives to persuade a sufficient percentage of the UK's radio-listening population to go digital. Its goal: to get into a stronger position to encourage the government to switch off the analogue signal.

The scheme, dubbed the Radio Amnesty, is backed by major retailers like John Lewis, Tesco, Comet and Argos, along with a host of independent shops.

Manufacturers supporting the scheme include Alba, Bush, MagicBox, Panasonic, Philips, Proline, Pure, Roberts and Sony.

The actual discount you receive will depend on which model of digital radio you choose and who you buy it from, but Digital Radio UK, the organisation promoting DAB to Brits, expects discounts to be around ten per cent.

Some suppliers may also offer higher discounts on their own-brand radios, a DR UK spokeswoman told Reg Hardware.

The scheme runs for just over a month, from Saturday, 22 May to Saturday, 26 June.

Old radios will be reconditioned where possible and donated to RadioFix, a charity working in southern Africa to co-ordinate various efforts to provide adults and kids with radios to help with their education. DR UK has suggested this before.

Philanthropic, maybe, but the Radio Amnesty is really about reducing Britain's reliance on FM. DR UK's goal is to get at least get half the radio-listening population tuning in to digital radio, and to ensure digital coverage matches that of FM. At that point, national, regional and larger local stations will be encouraged to move to digital only.

Even DR UK admits "the earliest this is likely to happen is 2015", and the more folk who junk their FM radios the better, in its book.

Last month the House of Lords Communications Committee recommended just such a scrappage scheme as Radio Amnesty when it recently deliberated on the future of radio in Britain.

But digital radio proponents face an uphill battle to kill FM: according to radio audience monitor Rajar, just 24 per cent of the UK population is listening in on digital radios.

Radios that can't be knocked back into shape will be recycled. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.