Feeds

Acer denies Chrome OS netbook launch is near

Worried by rumours?

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Acer has gone on record to state that it will not be launching netbooks based on Google's Chrome OS in the "short term".

"Acer believes that Chrome OS is without doubt an exciting product announcement and deserves its full attention as well as an in-depth study of its potential from a consumers perspective," the Taiwanese corporation said.

And here's the 'but...':

"Despite recent rumours in the press regarding the launch of Chrome OS-based netbooks at Computex, Acer today confirms that it has no short-term plans for such a product."

The company said it will "be following the development and progress of Google Chrome and the evolution of Google’s overall product strategy very closely".

This latest statement is in contrast to comments made earlier this year by Jim Wong, head of Acer’s IT products division. In January, Wong said ten per cent of Acer’s netbooks will feature Chrome after the OS' appearance in Q3.

Wong said the adoption of Chrome was motivated by “a change to the Microsoft-Intel environment”, indicating that the netbooks would use ARM-based processors.

A month earlier, Acer chairman JT Wang has said his firm will be first to launch a Chrome-based netbook.

Of course, all that was before the introduction and arrival of the iPad. Manufacturers like Acer will undoubtedly have been prompted by Apple device to rethink their hardware - netbooks, tablets and e-book readers - and operating system software strategies.

They may well conclude their original, pre-iPad approach is still the best one to take, but there's no doubt the iPad will have prompted a fresh look.

That Acer feels the need now to tell World+Dog it doesn't have a Chrome OS netbook in the works is surprising. If it was to release one in Q3 or Q4, an appearance of the prototype at Computex, which takes place early next month, would not be out of the ordinary.

Clearly it now wants to avoid disappointing market watchers which implies its timetable for release such product has been considerably delayed. Or even dropped altogether. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins
More USB ports than your laptop? You'd better believe it...
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?
Tip: Put the shades on and you'll look less of a spanner
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?