Feeds

UK border security ring-o-steel flagged 48,000 travellers

Intrusive backroom probes for EVERYONE!

High performance access to file storage

The £1.2bn e-Borders security system flagged more than 48,000 travellers for intrusive background checks last year, it has emerged.

Those automatically matched against intelligence watch lists are subjected to scrutiny of their criminal and financial records, as well as checks of their known associates.

The system currently covers only air travel, but is scheduled to screen all journeys in and out of the UK in 2014. The previous government approved e-Borders in 2004 amid controversy over wildly inaccurate immigration figures.

According to the Mail on Sunday, the system is being used to track sex offenders and football hooligans. Last year's 48,682 security alerts led to 2,000 arrests, it was reported. Some 1,000 people were denied entry to the UK as a result of e-Borders checks and 14,000 intelligence reports were created for future use.

Airlines supply the National Border Targeting Centre in Manchester - the centre of the e-Borders network - with information on passengers' travelling companions, their meal choices and how they paid for their ticket.

Hundreds of low-paid "match analysts" receive reports from the profiling system when this information, combined with previous travel histories and watch lists, raises a security alert. The reports are checked and passed on to police and intelligence agencies as deemed appropriate.

The MoS reported an internal Home Office document cited an example of when the profiling algorithms fail. One "potential suspect" was in fact a spinal injury patient travelling home with his nurse.

Separately this weekend, the Sunday Times reported that new government sources said the ongoing e-Borders implementation "is running even later and more over-budget than Labour ministers had admitted". A Home Office spokesman denied the claims today. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Big Content goes after Kim Dotcom
Six studios sling sueballs at dead download destination
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data
Prime minister: Nothing to see here, go about your business
Singapore decides 'three strikes' laws are too intrusive
When even a prurient island nation thinks an idea is dodgy it has problems
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Banks slap Olympus with £160 MEEELLION lawsuit
Scandal hit camera maker just can't shake off its past
France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours
«Email? Mais non ... il est plus tard que six heures du soir!»
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.