Feeds

HTML5 unfit for web TV, says Hulu

New player, same Flash

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Web-TV-streaming giant Hulu claims that HTML5 isn't ready for coding and broadcasting video on the web.

The service - America's answer to the BBC's iPlayer - released the latest version of its player built using Adobe Systems' ActionScript, saying that HTML5 is not ready for prime time.

Product video president Eugene Wei blogged that HTML5 "doesn't yet meet all of our customers' needs." The blog was unavailable at the time of writing, but you can read a cached version here.

Wei said that Hulu is contractually obliged to deliver a number of capabilities in its player, suggesting that these could not be achieved using HTML5. According to Wei:

Our player doesn't just simply stream video, it must also secure the content, handle reporting for our advertisers, render the video using a high performance codec to ensure premium visual quality, communicate back with the server to determine how long to buffer and what bitrate to stream, and dozens of other things that aren't necessarily visible to the end user.

HTML5 has yet to clear the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C's) standards process, but it has already been ordained by Google. Vice president of engineering Vic Gundotra said last year "we're betting big on HTML5" while the company is offering an experimental version of YouTube built using the HTML5 video tag. Interestingly, the HTML5 version of YouTube uses the patented H.264 codec, rather than the open-source codec Ogg Theora.

With Hulu's latest player, native resolution has been boosted 25 per cent to 720x404px. There's no chrome, so there aren't any buttons to interfere with the picture. Bit-rate streaming has been introduced to adjust the steam to suit a viewer's bandwidth, while a volume normalization feature will keep the volume consistent between programs and ads. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.