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Symantec says get HEP to the cloud

Throw your security servers onto the fire

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Symantec is telling small and medium enterprises to remove their security servers and let its HEP cloud service do the job instead.

SMEs will often have dedicated hardware or a server to look after site IT security. They could run Symantec's Endpoint Protection product in such a server to protect their notebooks, desktops, and servers against threats from the dreadful array of viruses, worms, Trojans, spyware, adware, bots, zero-day threats, and rootkits that assail them.

But it's another box and another product to manage. Why not have it in the cloud and offer Security-as-a-Service (SaaS) from a Hosted Endpoint Protection (HEP) facility?

That's what Symantec is now offering. It's scalable, always-on, quick to set up, managed from a web console, and available now to North American customers. It delivers antivirus, antispyware, firewall, and host-intrusion prevention for desktops and laptops, and antivirus and antispyware for file servers.

The service can be purchased on its own or combined with other Symantec Hosted Services.

If that floats your boat, you can sign up here for a free trial. ®

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