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Latest iPhone 4G leak reveals A4 CPU

Another prototype slips out

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Apple's ARM-based A4 processor, the CPU that powers the iPad, will also power the next iPhone.

Some bright spark in Vietnam managed to get hold of a prototype of the upcoming handset and not only took snaps of the machine from all angles, but took the blighter to bits.

Taoviet iPhone

Source: Taoviet

The phone's circuit board clearly shows an Apple be-logo'd chip marked with the model number 339S0084. As Engadget notes, that's the same set of alphanumerics that appear on the iPad's A4 processor.

Taoviet iPhone

A4 on board?
Source: Taoviet

The A4 in the iPad is clocked at 1GHz, but it's not known if the chip in the iPhone 4G runs at that same frequency too.

The A4 is a system-on-a-chip with components optimised for the needs of the iPhone OS and to maximise power conservation.

Taoviet iPhone

Source: Taoviet

The photos of the phone itself show a device almost identical to the one that got blog Gizmodo into so much trouble last month. It's a less curvy model than the iPhone 3G/3GS and sports a front-facing camera for video chats. ®

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