Feeds

Jacqui Smith and Charles Clarke shown the door

Being Home Secretary proves unpopular

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Former Home Secretary Jacqui Smith heads the list of high profile Labour casualties this morning.

Meanwhile current party top brass thought to be under threat, such as Ed Balls, have so far been returned by their constituents.

Karen Lumley, Smith's Tory opponent in the Redditch constituency overturned a majority of 1,948 to win by 5,821.

Smith had held the seat since Tony Blair's landslide victory in 1997. Britain's first woman Home Secretary, she quit the cabinet last June after controversies over her expenses - including infamous claims for her husband's pay-per-view pornography - and the classification of cannabis and ecstasy.

Smith's promotion to Home Secretary had been the headline-grabbing appointment of Gordon Brown's first reshuffle in 2007.

Charles Clarke, another former Labour Home Secretary and MP since 2007, was also defeated last night. He lost his Norwich South seat to Liberal Democrat Simon Wright by 310 votes, overturning a majority of 3,653.

Clarke's loss from the Commons is unlikely to be mourned by Gordon Brown. He has been a thorn in the side of the Labour leadership since returning to the back benches, repeatedly calling for Brown to step aside.

More junior ministers and former ministers so far removed include Mike O'Brien, of the Department of Health and Tony McNulty, yet another former Home Office minister, more recently at the Department of Work and Pensions. Like Jacqui Smith, he resigned his brief last year after expenses allegations.

David Blunkett, the Home Secretary who fathered the ID cards scheme, survived in his staunchly Labour Sheffield constituency, despite losing 14.6 per cent of his support.

He appeared on the BBC at 2am to predict outright Conservative victory, which now appears misguided. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.