Feeds

Cameron aims to bring LibDems into government

Electoral reform dilemma for Kingmaker Clegg

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

David Cameron has issued an invitation to the Liberal Democrats to form a stable government with the Conservatives, preferring long-term compromise to trying run a minority administration.

If taken up, the "big, open, comprehensive offer" is likely to mean Liberal Democrats would take up cabinet positions, rather than merely agreeing to vote through key budget legislation, a so-called confidence and supply agreement.

On the central negotiating issue of electoral reform, he suggested an all-party inquiry to set out options, but emphasised tweaks to the current system rather than the switch to proportional representation desired by the Liberal Democrats.

Nick Clegg's party has insisted Cameron has the first right to try to govern. Now the Tory leader has made them an offer, the Liberal Democrats' question is whether an inquiry into electoral reform, taking a minimum of several months, is satisfactory.

Cameron said the Tories would also be willing to give ground on a number of policy areas, and help Nick Clegg implement "key planks" of his election manifesto.

He emphasised the areas they agree on, such as scrapping ID cards, reforming school funding and reversing Labour's national insurance rise. However he also said the Conservatives would not change their stance on the EU, immigration or "keeping our defences strong" - a reference to Nick Clegg's opposition to the renewal of the Trident nuclear submarine fleet.

Earlier, Gordon Brown said he would defer any Labour approach to the Liberal Democrats until their talks with Cameron break down. He emphasised he was willing to move on electoral reform quickly.

The Liberal Democrat parliamentary party is scheduled to meet over the weekend to discuss their next move. In the meantime Nick Clegg and his senior colleagues will launch behind the scenes negotiations. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.