Feeds

Cameron aims to bring LibDems into government

Electoral reform dilemma for Kingmaker Clegg

Build a business case: developing custom apps

David Cameron has issued an invitation to the Liberal Democrats to form a stable government with the Conservatives, preferring long-term compromise to trying run a minority administration.

If taken up, the "big, open, comprehensive offer" is likely to mean Liberal Democrats would take up cabinet positions, rather than merely agreeing to vote through key budget legislation, a so-called confidence and supply agreement.

On the central negotiating issue of electoral reform, he suggested an all-party inquiry to set out options, but emphasised tweaks to the current system rather than the switch to proportional representation desired by the Liberal Democrats.

Nick Clegg's party has insisted Cameron has the first right to try to govern. Now the Tory leader has made them an offer, the Liberal Democrats' question is whether an inquiry into electoral reform, taking a minimum of several months, is satisfactory.

Cameron said the Tories would also be willing to give ground on a number of policy areas, and help Nick Clegg implement "key planks" of his election manifesto.

He emphasised the areas they agree on, such as scrapping ID cards, reforming school funding and reversing Labour's national insurance rise. However he also said the Conservatives would not change their stance on the EU, immigration or "keeping our defences strong" - a reference to Nick Clegg's opposition to the renewal of the Trident nuclear submarine fleet.

Earlier, Gordon Brown said he would defer any Labour approach to the Liberal Democrats until their talks with Cameron break down. He emphasised he was willing to move on electoral reform quickly.

The Liberal Democrat parliamentary party is scheduled to meet over the weekend to discuss their next move. In the meantime Nick Clegg and his senior colleagues will launch behind the scenes negotiations. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS
YouGov poll reveals terrible truth about the enemy within
Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?
Do Brits risk arrest for watching beheading video nasty? We asked the fuzz
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
NBN Co claims 96 mbps download speeds for FTTN trial
Umina trial also delivers 30 mbps uploads, but exact rig used not revealed
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?