Feeds

Election 2010: The sillier options

Who's for the compulsory serving of asparagus at breakfast?

The Power of One Infographic

With the UK general election upon us, the chances are that you have already decided how to vote. But if – like almost 40 per cent of the electorate, according to some current polls – you still haven’t made up your mind, here are a few more tools to help you decide.

We have already looked in some detail at the manifestos of the "serious" contenders for office. Some readers may still be sceptical of the credentials of parties that advocate Wi-Fi enabled chain gangs for criminals (BNP) or even the absurd notion that the UK still requires a non-compulsory identity card and national identity register (Labour). However, the following are some of what are regarded by the establishment as being at the sillier end of UK politics.

First up, the Pirate Party. Despite their roguish title, their manifesto focuses very seriously on three important areas: copyright and patent law, privacy law and freedom of speech. They want a much more balanced "fair use" approach to copyright – and they demand a return to individual privacy and free speech which they believe has been eroded under New Labour. How exceptionally (un)silly of them!

Mebyon Kernow is all about Cornish rights. We can’t find a manifesto but their core values suggest an approach not altogether dissimilar from that of Plaid Cymru – putting Cornwall first, and instituting policies based on local knowledge, rather than the view from London: a bit worthy and not very silly at all.

Another party that sounds as though it ought to be silly, but isn’t, is the English Democrat party. With 108 claimed candidates in the coming election, they are a relatively credible force. Their manifesto focuses mostly on the case for splitting out English matters from the Westminster parliament and dealing with them in an English one. Whether this is enough to solve our current economic woes is doubtful – but it is interesting.

Following recent fallings-out between government and experts, the Science Party might be just what the UK needs, given their commitment to investing in "research and in the creativity of our scientists and engineers". However, they then quite spoil their chances of being taken seriously with the ludicrous demand that "school pupils need to be able to study biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics, taught by specialist teachers with a relevant degree". Ridiculous!

With their aim of taking "the cynicism out of British politics, by taking the politicians out of your everyday life", it is possible that the Libertarian party might appeal to some readers. When it comes to silliness, however, the Libertarian Party quite fails to meet the required standard. Their manifesto has received a good deal of serious thought, contains sensible demands for the removal of DNA from the DNA database, and the scrapping of the NIR – and at 39 pages is just too long to be taken spuriously.

Sadly, for those wishing to encourage the silly tendency in UK politics, the Natural Law party is not standing in the 2010 election. The days of entrusting the defence of the realm to trained cadres of yogic flyers are therefore at an end.

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.