Feeds

Internet Explorer drops below 60% market share

How low can you go?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Less than two thirds of surfers are now using Microsoft's browser on the web as Google's Chrome continues its northward assault.

Internet Explorer slipped below 60 per cent of the market in April - 59.95 per cent, to be precise - according to the latest figures from Net Applications. That was down from 60.65 per cent in March and 67.77 per cent in April 2009.

IE first drifted into sub-70-per-cent territory in January 2009, meaning it has taken 15 months for Microsoft to drop the last 10 per centage points.

Meanwhile, Google's Chrome continued its steady climb in April. It hit 6.73 per cent, compared to 6.13 per cent for March and 1.79 per cent in April 2009. Google first released Chrome in September 2008.

Firefox, once the biggest threat to IE, has hit a plateau: Mozilla's open-source browser reached 24.59 per cent for April, compared with 24.52 per cent for March and 23.84 per cent for a year ago.

Before we go further, let's take a moment: IE hit its high point around 2002 and 2003 with 95 per cent of the market. By November 2007, it was on 79.49 per cent, and Firefox was on 15.54 per cent at that time.

While the story of IE's decline is not new, what is significant is the release of a new operating system - Windows 7 - has not arrested the downward drift. Microsoft has claimed Windows 7 is its fastest ever selling version of Windows, with 100 million licenses.

Yet, despite IE 8's general growth to just under 25 per cent in April, it's not been sufficient to reverse the overall decline of Microsoft's browser.

This would suggest that either Windows isn't puling in the surfers or that the OS sales numbers are not quite what they seem.

Windows 7 has been mainly sold to consumers, with businesses postponing sales and installation. These numbers could suggest the importance of business uptake of IE 8. It's possible consumers are distorting the numbers mix.

Decline and growth might kick in once business users start rolling out Windows 7 in large numbers and updating their browser-based applications to IE 8 from the horribly dated IE 7 and IE 6, which are still out there in large numbers.

As for actual uptake, Microsoft has been careful to say that its record number refers to "licenses" sold. That does not necessarily translate into actual PCs in the market, and it could merely mean these are licenses sold to OEMs and a variety of other makers who've yet to use the software or have it sitting on unsold machines in the channel. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.