Feeds

.XXX accuses ICANN of 'lip service' on porn domain

Porn domain bidder calls whitewash

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The company behind the proposed .xxx internet domain has accused ICANN of trying to weasel its way out of approving the porn-only domain.

ICM Registry, which has been fighting for the right to run the domain for a decade, said ICANN staff members prepared “fundamentally flawed” advice, designed to confuse its own board of directors.

A three-man Independent Review Panel recently ruled that ICANN broke its own fairness rules when it rejected .xxx in 2007 under pressure from the Bush administration, having previously approved it.

The IRP made a two-to-one majority decision, but unanimously agreed that its own ruling was non-binding, which has given ICANN some wiggle-room on how it handles the proposal.

The organisation is currently soliciting public comment on a set of four post-IRP “process options” for .xxx. Three of the four options still lead to ICM's bid being rejected.

This has unsurprisingly angered the wannabe registry. In a response paper released last night, ICM claims: “ICANN Staff propose to give lip service to the Declaration of the Panel, but not correct any of the violations that the Panel identified.”

The company demands that ICANN stop messing about laying “traps, hurdles and obstructions” and return to the contract talks it quit three years ago, if it wants to show the world that it can be objective and accountable.

The IRP is the final court of appeal to challenge ICANN's decisions, short of going to an actual court of law. But ICM is in fact likely to take its case to court should ICANN reject its bid. A lawsuit could quite easily have a nine-figure dollar value attached.

ICANN's revisiting of .xxx has caused a tsunami of complaints from US Christian groups, which believe it will lead to an increase in internet porn. It has also raised objections from porn trade group the Free Speech Coalition, which believes it could lead to censorship.

ICANN will likely make its decision during a public meeting in Brussels next month. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.