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Apple rejects crazy canuck's seal bludgeon game

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Apple has rejected an animated seal-clubbing game, in a move that many may consider to be a smidgen inconsistent.

iSealClub allows the happy bloodthirsty user to batter the bejesus out of blubbery aquatic mammals. The clubbing of seal cubs is illegal even in Canada, so the game knocks off points for any attempt at that while the cub makes a successful getaway. But that's not enough for Apple, which has rejected the application citing the rules on "objectionable" content.

The developer argues that gunning down animals for fun is perfectly permissible as evidenced by all the hunting games on iTunes, while Pocket God encourages players to flick pygmies into volcanoes and Grand Theft Auto allows the gunning down of police officers just to watch them die.

Inconsistencies from Apple are nothing new, though this is the first one that's earned Steve Jobs a box of chocolates: sent from PETA in recognition of his sterling work for non-existent animal welfare.

The developer figured he'd be OK based on previous approvals, but one can't help thinking that anyone involved in Apple development should know better by now. ®

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