Feeds

Handset also-rans create new mobile platform

Because what we need is another standard

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Third-tier mobile handset manufacturers have banded together to make a new mobile application platform - as if the industry didn't have enough already.

DoCoMo, Renesas, Fujitsu, NEC, Panasonic and Sharp will be happy to licence the new application platform out to the rest of the industry, in case anyone feels that Android, iPhone, Symbian, Bada, Blackberry, WebOS, Windows and LiMo don't offer enough choice for the aspiring developer.

To be fair the as-yet-unnamed platform doesn't seek to replace any of these; it's supposed to sit on top of them and provide a standard API for accessing local resources. So it's a bit like the Joint Innovation Lab (JIL), but deeper and not backed by the two largest network operators in the world and their friends.

The new platform will initially sit on top of Symbian and Linux. Apparently the team is considering porting the platform to "open operating systems such as Android" - inferring a worrying belief that neither Symbian nor Linux are as open as Google's baby, but perhaps that's just a mistake of translation.

But the new platform will be sitting lower than the kind of widget platform proposed by the JIL, as it will "offer improved processing speeds for high-quality video and enhanced 3D graphics processing for advanced mobile multimedia functions". But this won't be until 2012 – right now it's just a picture:

Block diagram of the new platform

What the companies obviously have in mind is an API for creating branded interfaces, which can then be applied to Symbian and LiMo handsets just as HTC applies it's Sense interface across the underlying platforms. None are in the mass-market phone business yet, though Sharp is making Microsoft's Kin handsets and lined up to make the Else, a handset based on Access Linux.

Reducing development costs is sensible, but it shows just how chaotic the mobile industry is that even third-tier manufacturers want to avoid being tied to a single OS. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.