Feeds

Chocolate Factory eats crow on Googlephone

Nexus One bows to carrier might

Remote control for virtualized desktops

When Google uncloaked the Nexus One and started selling the self-styled "superphone" through its own online store, the company insisted it wasn't competing with Verizon Wireless, Motorola, and all those other those partners selling all those other Android phones. But it appears that these Android partners have since convinced Google that such talk was indeed nonsense.

On Monday, Google not only said it will sell the Nexus One through partner retail shops in Europe, it also indicated it no longer intends to launch a version of the phone for Verizon's American wireless network.

The day the Nexus One arrived, the scuttlebutt was that Verizon - like Motorola - was less than pleased with Google's decision to sell its own handset, and now, we can only assume that Verizon and Vodafone, Verizon's part owner, have forced the web giant to eat some crow.

This may have something do with the fact that the Nexus One isn't what you'd call a top seller. Estimates indicate Google has unloaded a mere 500,000 devices since the launch on January 5. But on launch day, Google said it would be "would be happy to sell about 150,000" devices.

The idea, the company said at the time, was to create a "revolutionary" new channel that would make it easier for the world to buy smartphones - regardless of how many devices it sold in the short term. But less than four months later, the company is reading from a very different script.

"Our partners have played an amazing role in making Android successful, and the Android ecosystem has grown faster than our most optimistic expectations of even just a few months ago," the company tells us. "By working with Vodafone and other operators in Europe, we’ll be able to get more Nexus One phones to more people more quickly."

In January, Google wasn't concerned about the health of the Android "ecosystem." At least, it didn't claim to be. It painted its online store as something that would operate alongside existing channels, not just in the short term but for many handsets to come. "Nexus One belongs in a class of device, which we call, superphones," vice president of product management Mario Queiroz said that January morning.

"It's the first device, the first phone, which we will bring to market with our operator and hardware partners from a series of devices...You might be asking how are we going to bring this product to market. Well, today, we're also pleased to announce a new way for consumers to purchase a mobile phone through a Google-hosted webstore."

Android project lead Andy Rubin said that existing partners like Verizon were willing to join this webstore for certain "efficiencies." Google's direct model would cut out all sorts of overhead wireless operators are just dying to cutout. "[Operators] just want to sell service plans," he said. "This [web store] enables them to reach consumers very efficiently."

Well, now even Google is awful close to acknowledging that this was just talk. "We have decided that the best and fastest way to get Nexus One into the hands of European consumers is through our partners," the company said today. Note the word "best."

And this admission is born out by that fact that in addition to offering the Nexus One through Vodafone shops and other retail stores in Europe, the company is not selling to the Continent through its webstore - and it has apparently reversed plans to offer a CDMA-based Nexus One on Verizon, the largest US carrier in the US, with roughly 90 million subscribers.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Next page: Under pressure

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Apple spent just ONE DOLLAR beefing up the latest iPad Air 2
New iPads look a lot like the old one. There's a reason for that
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Microsoft fitness bands slapped on wrists: All YOUR HEALTH DATA are BELONG TO US
Wearable will deliver 'actionable insights for healthier living'
Lawyers mobilise angry mob against Apple over alleged 2011 Macbook Pro crapness
We suffered 'random bouts of graphical distortion' - fanbois
Caterham Seven 160 review: The Raspberry Pi of motoring
Back to driving's basics with a joyously legal high
Back to the ... drawing board: 'Hoverboard' will disappoint Marty McFly wannabes
Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?